print header

 

Convention Workshops

All Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration will open at 7:30am Friday morning.

Morning Workshops (See WS #2 for ethics, #3 for cultural diversity, #5 for supervision)
Afternoon Workshops (See WS #7 and #10 for ethics, #8 for cultural diversity)
Bonus Workshop

Please note: If you register for the ADHD PDI, you will automatically be registered for convention.

ALL DAY TRACK

All day workshop track on Achievement testing. You can one or both of the 3 hour workshops.

1AM. Achievement Testing for a Neuropsychological Perspective: The Quest for Convergent Validity

Rebecca B. Resnik, Psy.D. and R. Patrick Savage, Ph.D.

Workshop Full.

Workshop Level: Intermediate to Advanced.
Please note: Given that copyrighted material will be shown and discussed, attendees must be psychologists/school psychologists, registered Psychological Associates, graduate students in psychology, LCPC or other individuals qualified to work with psychoeducational test materials.

Achievement testing is a rich data source for neuropsychological diagnosis. This workshop is designed to teach a brain-behavior informed method of analyzing achievement test data in support of making evidence-based diagnoses. This workshop is designed to provide either a full day's 'deep dive' into this topic, or it can be attended as a morning or afternoon 'standalone'. Each half will include opportunities for discussion and analysis of case material.

The morning workshop focuses on achievement testing from a neuropsychological perspective, including how instruction changes the brain, as well as current neuroscience research about learning, memory, executive functioning, and the emotional underpinnings of learning. The presenters will discuss how to use achievement test scores to establish convergent validity in support of your diagnosis. Special attention will be paid to the development of executive functions and conceptualizing the brain as a 'predictive modeling system', that uses statistical analysis to make sense of experience. Attendees will learn a framework for evaluating neuropsychological demands of achievement test to create a richer profile of the person's cognitive strengths and weaknesses.

This workshop is designed to help you:

  • Apply the concept of convergent validity to use of achievement tests in psychological assessment;
  • Enrich your understanding of the neuropsychological functions underlying performance on popular achievement test tasks;
  • Apply a framework for analyzing what neuropsychological constructs achievement tests purport to measure vs what cognitive abilities are essential to performing the task;
  • Develop proficiency in the use of the four levels of inference, including specific application of this approach to understanding test data, such as error analysis, to more fully understand what their test results reveal about the child.

1PM. Achievement Testing for a Neuropsychological Perspective: The Quest for Convergent Validity

Rebecca B. Resnik, Psy.D. and R. Patrick Savage, Ph.D.

Workshop Full.

Workshop Level: Intermediate to Advanced.
Please note: Given that copyrighted material will be shown and discussed, attendees must be psychologists/school psychologists, registered Psychological Associates, graduate students in psychology, LCPC or other individuals qualified to work with psychoeducational test materials.

The afternoon workshop will focus more specifically on using popular achievement tests from a neuropsychological perspective to inform diagnosis and interventions/accommodations. Participants will learn to evaluate test data using the 'four levels of inference' that provide a richer understanding of the available test data. The presenters will review how popular rests assess typical cognitive changes in response to instruction in reading, writing, and mathematics. Attendees will review specific subtests from widely used assessments and evaluate their usefulness from a neuropsychological perspective. Attendees will learn how to integrate the data from achievement tests to establish convergent validity, and apply this orientation to a variety of case examples. The examiners will present case material for analysis that shows differences in achievement test performance from individuals with high incidence disabilities (particularly specific learning disabilities, ADHD, and ASD). The principles utilized in this workshop can be used for evaluations of individuals of any age but the focus will be upon children adolescents, and young adults.

This workshop is designed to help you:

  • Apply the concept of convergent validity to use of achievement tests in psychological assessment;
  • Compare and contrast features of popular achievement tasks for diagnosis and informing interventions;
  • Apply a framework for analyzing what neuropsychological constructs achievement tests purport to measure vs what cognitive abilities are essential to performing the task;
  • Develop proficiency in the use of the four levels of inference, including specific application of this approach to understanding test data, such as error analysis, to more fully understand what their test results reveal about the child.

MORNING WORKSHOPS

3 CE Credits Each

2. The Accidental Expert: Roles and Responsibilities of Psychologists in the Legal Arena

Gar Robbins, J.D. and Maureen Vernon, Ph.D.

This workshop meets the Maryland licensing requirement for Ethics/Laws/or Risk Management

Workshop Level: Intermediate

The workshop will provide a roadmap for psychologists to follow when they find themselves involved in the Court system as an Expert Witness. Answering the Questions: How did I get here? How do you meet your duties to Client, Court, and Self? The different roles a psychologist is asked to fill will be examined from the perspective of the client, the provider, the lawyers, and the judge. The ethical considerations and potential pitfalls will be described and discussed. Concepts will be explored through examples and sample scenarios. Suggested procedures to address common situations and the demands and limits of client confidentiality will be explored. The participants will be able to understand and apply a Response Decision Tree when they receive a subpoena, or other communications requesting client information. The workshop will present guidelines for testifying in depositions and at trial, including preparation, documentation and the process of direct and cross-examination.

This workshop is designed to help you:

  • Recognize the legal definition of an "expert witness";
  • Explain the various roles that psychologists are asked to perform in the legal system;
  • List potential ethical conflicts and challenges for psychologists in family law;
  • Organize and prepare paperwork to go or not go to court;
  • Review and observe court procedures.


3. Understanding and Working effectively with LGBT Substance Users

Joshua Riley, LPC, NCC

Workshop Full.

This workshop meets the Maryland licensing requirement for activities designed to enhance competence in the provision of psychological services to culturally diverse populations.

Workshop Level:Intermediate- There will be a brief review of LGBTQ language basics, however please have a working knowledge of substance misuse and abuse.

Cultural competency with sexual and gender minorities (SGM) goes beyond just understanding seemingly ever-changing acronyms and terms. This session will explore how to competently swim in this alphabet soup with LGBTQ persons who misuse or abuse substances. Citing critical research, this workshop will explore the relationship between HIV and substance misuse, emphasizing the dynamics of methamphetamine use among gay and bisexual men. Skill-building will focus on sexual health and harm reduction approaches to working with this population including recommendations for screening and assessment. We will also briefly explore biomedical advances in HIV prevention and treatment and the implications for working with substance users.

This workshop is designed to help you:

  • Describe the dynamics of substance abuse within and unique treatment needs of the LGBT population;
  • Explore the dynamic relationship between substance misuse and HIV in this population;
  • Explore working with the LGPT population from a sex-positive and harm reduction approach.


4.Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Children with ADHD

Tana Clarke, Ph.D.

Workshop Full.

This Workshop is part of the ADHD PDI, click here for more information and register for the PDI.

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an empirically supported treatment for a variety of childhood disorders. However, implementing this kind of treatment with children with attention problems can be uniquely challenging. Additionally, variability within the diagnostic category of ADHD, as well as the frequent comorbidity associated with ADHD can further contribute to challenges effectively implementing CBT with children with ADHD. The program will review recent developments in the ADHD field about behavioral and cognitive behavioral treatment of attention problems. This workshop will also focus on designing a clinically appropriate treatment plan and will spend a significant amount of time focusing on practical clinical resources, including technology and applications, treatment worksheets and handouts, and other hands-on clinical methods to utilize in treatment.

This workshop is designed to help you:

  • Identify the challenges and nuances associated with diagnosing ADHD in children;
  • Develop a clinically appropriate treatment plan that addresses the unique challenges of children with attention problems;
  • Prepare practical and hands-on strategies to implement Cognitive behavioral treatment for childhood attention problems.

5. A Clinical Supervision Toolkit: Skills to Enhance Supervision and Essential Knowledge for Ethical and Legal Practice

Diane Adlestein, Ph.D. and Jeffrey Barnett, Psy.D., ABPP

This workshop meets the Maryland licensing requirement for Supervision.

Workshop Full.

Workshop Level: Intermediate. This workshop is for mental health professionals who currently provide or plan to provide clinical supervision. Although a solid foundation of clinical skills is presumed, no prior specialized training or experience in psychodynamic psychotherapy is needed.

Part 1: Enhancing Supervision Skills with the use of Psychodynamic Psychology Clinical Supervision requires complex skills that one does not develop simply by virtue of having been supervised. Yet, many clinicians receive little formal training in supervision. This workshop focuses on the application of psychodynamic psychology to the practice of clinical supervision. The main goal is to inform attendees of how applying certain key psychodynamic concepts can enhance one's skills as a supervision regardless of one's theoretical orientation of treatment approach. Topics to be covered include the following: understanding parallel process, appreciating the importance of teaching supervisees to recognize and appropriately disclose counter-transference, and using counter-transference to monitor therapist boundaries and to inform treatment decisions. A particular focus will be on concepts that help in working with anxious supervisees, such as the application of Winnicott's "holding environment," (Winnicott, 1965) and Adler's concept of counter-transference incompetence (Adler, 1972.)

Part 2: Ethical and Legal Essentials for Clinical Supervisors
Clinical supervision will be addressed as a core competency for psychologists. The difference between supervision and consultation will be highlighted and the legal aspects of supervision and responsibilities of supervisors will be addressed. The specific competencies involved in being an effective supervisor will be described to include the two types of competence every supervisor must possess. Relevant ethics issues for supervisors will be presented to include the role of informed consent and the supervision contract, documentation and record keeping, the role of the supervisor as gatekeeper of the profession, confidentiality, boundaries and multiple relationships and ending the supervisory relationship. Specific attention will be paid to the supervision of both students and Psychology Associates, reviewing legal responsibilities and liabilities. Recommendations for proactively addressing the challenges that frequently arise and for promoting ethical practice will be presented and resources to support ethical effective supervision will be shared.

This workshop is designed to help you:

  • Apply understanding of parallel process to enhance one's practice of clinical supervision;
  • Explain the usefulness of teaching supervisees to recognize and effectively utilize (i.e. not avoid) counter-transference reactions regardless of treatment approach;
  • Utilize understanding of counter-transference to monitor and attend to therapist boundary crossing and help therapist maintain an appropriate treatment frame;
  • Identify at least two different patterns of response to anxiety in supervisees as well as two different psychodynamic concepts that can assist in managing supervisee anxiety;
  • Explain the ethics issues relevant to serving as a clinical supervisor;
  • Describe the legal responsibilities and liabilities associated with being a clinical supervisor;
  • List the positive actions you can take to proactively address common ethics challenges in supervision.


6. Managing Angry and Challenging Patients

W. Robert Nay, Ph.D.

Workshop Level: Intermediate.

Anger is an information-rich emotion that signals expectations and unmet needs. It comes in many forms or "faces", including hostility, aggression/abuse, sarcasm, passive-aggression, and "cold" anger, each of which can wreak havoc on individual lives and relationships and even lead to dangerous acting-out. Often individual, couple, or family therapy cannot commence until anger is tamed. Sometimes a job or relationship is at stake. The "STOP" Model developed by the presenter is a brain-based, cognitive-behavioral technology based on the empirical literature that teaches adults, children, and adolescents to recognize and derail biological and cognitive symptoms of anger arousal early on, to restructure anger thinking and to redirect this powerful emotion to problem resolution. This highly-focused seminar is designed for psychologists, who wish to add the latest cognitive-behavioral (CBT) and short-term anger intervention strategies to their repertoires.

This workshop is designed to help you:

  • Distinguish between "Expressive" and "Instrumental" anger expressions to assess prognosis;
  • Designed an individualized treatment plan for hostility, aggression/abuse or "hidden/passive" anger;
  • Implement the "STOP" model (Nay, 2012,2014) to quickly interrupt, defuse, and redirect anger
  • Teach powerful defusing strategies to help clients respond to aggression directed at them, while remaining calm.

Back to Top


AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS

3 CE Credits Each

7. The Roles of a Psychologist in High Conflict Custody Disputes and the Challenges for Clinicians with Court Involved Clients

Mollie G Caplis, J.D., Frederick L. Kobb, J.D. and John Lefkowitz, Ph.D., ABPP

This workshop meets the Maryland licensing requirement for Ethics/Laws/or Risk Management

Workshop Level: Beginning to Intermediate

In the context of a high conflict custody dispute, psychologist can serve in various roles including 1) an individual therapist for a parent or child; 2) a custody evaluator to conduct a study and analysis of the needs and development of a child and of the abilities of the parties to care for the child and meet the child's needs; 3) a mental health evaluator to conduct an evaluations of a parent's mental health which may include, but is not limited to, psychological testing; 4) an expert witness to render an opinion on particular issues such as attachment, parent alienation, the impact(s) of violence, abuse, or mental health issues; 5) a parent coordinator to serve in the role of an impartial provider of parenting coordination services; 6) a coach or child specialist in the collaborative law processes; or 6) a mediator. Particular attention will be paid to the varying duties of the therapist when serving in these roles, the qualifications required for each role, and the existence of confidential privilege and the circumstance in which the waiver of privilege is permissible.

Dr. Lefkowitz will discuss ethical, legal and clinical challenges associated with cases involving family law matters such as divorce, custody disputes and child abuse. One of the most emotionally charged and frequent areas of dispute concern families confronting allegation of alienation (also known as gatekeeping). He will then discuss current trends in alienation/gatekeeping; challenges for therapist confronting these issues and ethical pitfalls when clients commence a contentious divorce. A framework for understanding alienation and gatekeeping along a continuum of facilitative gatekeeping to restrictive gatekeeping and where alienation fits in will be described. Challenges associated with providing psychotherapy to individual adults, children, and families during a litigated divorce will also be discussed. In addition, potential ethical challenges associated with these cases will be addressed.

This workshop is designed to help you:

  • Identify the qualifications and responsibilities of the different roles a therapist may play in the context of a custody dispute, and distinguish between the roles of a treating psychologist and a forensic psychologist;
  • List forms of alternate dispute resolution, predict the litigation process and compile the applicable Maryland case law and Rules;
  • Demonstrate the understanding of gatekeeping in family law disputes and how it is related to alienation;
  • Recognize potential therapeutic challenges associated with contentious divorce disputes and how to address in therapeutic context;


8. Broaching Race and Culture in Counseling: Strategies and Considerations

Hannah Bayne, Ph.D. and Susan Branco, Ph.D.

This workshop meets the Maryland licensing requirement for activities designed to enhance competence in the provision of psychological services to culturally diverse populations.

Workshop Full.

Workshop Level:All levels. Understanding of multicultural issues including privilege, power dynamics, and sociocultural issues is preferred. Please have an understanding of racial identity development, as well as, previous clinical experience working with culturally diverse clients.

Broaching is a strategy of openly and explicitly addressing racial and cultural dynamics in the counseling session, particularly in terms of discussing interpersonal differences between the counselor and client and/or acknowledgment of racial/cultural factors that may influence the client's presenting concerns (Day-Vines et al., 2007). Previous research indicates that broaching can improve the therapeutic relationship and enhance client perspective of counselor credibility (Chang & Yoon, 2015; Zhang & Burkard, 2008), while avoiding broaching has been associated with clients experiencing microaggressions in counseling, as well as feeling misunderstood and early termination (Chang & Yoon, 2015; Constantine, 2007; Davis & Gelsomino, 2994; Zhang & Burkard, 2008). Existing models of broaching race and culture are often focused more specifically on white counselors in training, due to the historical and systemic influences of color blindness and typically lower racial awareness among white individuals (Bartolie, Bentley-Edwards, Garcia, Michael& Ervin, 2015; Day-Vines et al., 2007). Previous research had also suggested that counselors of color have differential experiences than their white counterparts, in both counselor training and in clinical practice (Davis & Gelsomino, 1994; Haskins et al., 2013; Maton et al., 2011).


The presenters completed a phenomenological qualitative study in which we interviewed counselors of color regarding their experiences broaching racial and cultural issues in counseling. Themes indicated that counselors of color experience a complex process of gauging client racial identity and openness to broaching conversations, and that they often must weigh various considerations before broaching in session. This presentation will focus on conceptualizations of broaching in counseling, explore the results from our research study, and apply the information through clinical case studies and demonstrations. We will focus on how to navigate complex race and culture-related discussion and offer a forum for participants to reflect on their own experiences addressing these issues in counseling.

This workshop is designed to help you:

  • Identify theoretical elements of the broaching model, including obtaining familiarity with the broaching behavior continuum;
  • Discuss findings from the presenters' research on broaching for counselors of color and consider how finding may complicate or clarify broaching as a clinical strategy;
  • Apply presentation concepts through analysis of a live demonstration and small group participation in culturally diverse case studies.


9. Treating ADHD-Affected Couples

Carol Ann Robbins, Ph.D.

Workshop Level: Workshop level: Intermediate (But Beginning and Advanced are welcome)

This Workshop is part of the ADHD PDI, click here for more information and register for the PDI.

Couples in which one or both members have ADHD are often more challenging to treat and benefit from therapist awareness of the neurobiological impact of ADHD on their function and behavior. This presentation will address the impact of ADHD on individuals and couples, the common pitfalls they face, and effective approaches to treat them. Hot topics, such as money, sexual intimacy, cyber overuse, and co-parenting will also be discussed. An ADHD-adapted version of Imago Relationship Therapy will be offered as a beneficial model for increasing understanding, communication, and connection while reducing reactivity.

This workshop is designed to help you:

  • Describe the ways ADHD affected couples are different from other couples and what the most common challenges are for them;
  • List specific strategies to use in treatment with ADHD-affected couples;
  • Explain The basics of an ADHD-adapted Imago Relationship Therapy Approach;
  • Identify the typical hot topics ADHD-affected couples often deal with and list some possible solutions to address them.

10. Being a Paid Helper: Clinical and Ethical Challenges of Money, the "Last Taboo" in Psychotherapy

Sandor (Alex) Szollos, Ph.D.

This workshop meets the Maryland licensing requirement for Ethics/Laws/or Risk Management

Workshop Level:All levels

This workshop will examine the role of money, its clinical impact on and ethical challenges for helpers in their interactions with clients. We are much better at talking about sex then money, the "last taboo" in our contemporary American society. This is especially true in the helping professions: the bibliography of the entire literature on this topic written in the past 100+ years may take up less than a dozen pages. However, our reluctance to address the role of money in the therapy process has not only maintained major problems in therapeutic interactions, but also had been a perennial challenge in the development of our professional identities. How can one be an altruistic and ethical helper and also have a legitimate desire for recognition, status and making a good living at the same time? The clinical problems and ethical dilemmas are relevant for all helpers, regardless of discipline, setting, treatment modality, how services are paid for, etc., especially in the current climate of economic uncertainty and health care flux. This workshop will present a multidisciplinary approach to the clinical and ethical challenges of the "last taboo" by address the following:

  • Ethical helping and ethical business practice
  • Morality of money and our professional self-image
  • The context of helping and the context of business
  • The ethics of being a Paid Helper

The presentation will be interspersed with concrete examples of clinical, ethical and business challenges to the application of the five habits of ethical clinical practice in relation to money. At the end, ample time will be set aside for the audience to present questions and examples from their own professional experience.

This workshop is designed to help you:

  • Explain how money affects therapists in their interactions with clients and explore how helpers' discomfort about money creates obstacles for ethical clinical practice;
  • Prepare a financial autobiography and evaluate your own vulnerabilities in the context of helping;
  • Distinguish between the context of helping and the context of business, analyze the overlap between the two contexts and appraise the ethical challenges of providing effective clinical help in today's economy;
  • Discuss ethical considerations in how the apparent conflict between providing altruistic help and following sound business practices may be resolved;
  • Describe the five habits of ethical clinical practice in relation to money.

11. Applied Sport and Performance Psychology in Clinical Practice

Daniel Zimet, Ph.D.

Workshop Level: This workshop is intended for intermediate or stronger practitioners looking to gain beginner tools to work with athletes and overall performance enhancement.

Although there is general agreement with Yogi Berra's observation that "baseball is 90% mental", in practice attention to the mental side of sport remain profoundly underappreciated. In point of fact, research has increasingly noted what every sports enthusiast has opined for centuries; that the mind plays a central - and often prominent- role in performance outcomes. Some areas of note include choking, emotional regulation (i.e. anxiety), dealing with complex and stressful relationship and environments, overcoming negative events (e.g. losing, injury, getting 'cut'), motivational lapses, retirement, and above all else performing at your best when the stakes are at their highest. It is into these waters that the Sport Psychologist wades, utilizing knowledge from a range of fields including but not restricted to exercise science (e.g. biomechanics, kinesiology, motor learning), clinical psychology, and coaching.

This workshop, intended for Psychologists curious about athletes but with no specific training on the subject, will cover three main topics. We start with a broad understanding of the world of sport and exercise, with a particular focus on where applied sport consultants make the strongest impact. In this segment, you will learn about who Sport Psychologists are, what they do, where they work, how they're trained, and what roles they play. Second, we will explore several of the most commonly used clinical tools, theories and research findings in Sports Psychology and how this knowledge can be applied to athletes as well as non-athlete clientele. Third, we will illuminate how the training and experience you already possess can be applied to the world of sport, and what you will need to consider when specifically utilizing these techniques with athletes. At the conclusion of this workshop, which includes video, phenomenological experiences, and vignettes, I intend for you to know enough about Sport Psychology to consider best practices for athlete referrals.

This workshop is designed to help you:

  • Describe Sport Psychology as a field and specialty;
  • Identify prominent research, theory and practices of Sport Psychology;
  • Create a plan to use current experience and training common to psychologists with an athlete population.

Back to Top


BONUS WORKSHOP – 1 CE Credit


Board of Examiners: Professional Wills and PsyPact

Neal Morris, Ed.D., MS, CBSM, ABPP, James Gormally, Ph.D., ABPP

Back to Top

Schedule, Pricing & Registration Details